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Athletics (Track & Field, Wheelchair Racing)

  • Athletics (Track & Field, Wheelchair Racing)

    If you can sprint swiftly, throw forcefully, jump brawnfully or endure a distance run; you have what it takes to be in Athletics. At the Paralympic Games, Track & Field is a sport that attracts the largest number of athletes and spectators. It’s a sport that offers wide exposure to a range of competitions. Athletics has been part of the Paralympic Games since 1969 and the events are open to athletes of all disability groups from both genders.

     

    Through dedicated athletes and technological advancement, the sport has made unimaginable feats become reality. Some compete in wheelchairs, while others with prostheses, and visually impaired athletes with the guidance of a sighted companion. IPC is the governing body for athletics through the International Paralympic Athletics Committee.

     

    What’s in it for you?

    Athletics help one discover one’s fullest potential. From getting you physically fit to building your levels of perseverance, athletics play a huge role in contouring a fine athlete. Athletics help improve one’s physical and mental resistance and enhances physical and psychological confidence. Through training, wheelchair racers are able to strengthen their upper body and improve joint flexibility while gaining lower body independence; whilst track and field athletes build physical stamina in the arms and legs, strength in the abdominals and legs, gain hip mobility and many other benefits in accordance to the nature of activity that they participate in.

    Eligibility

    Amputees    Cerebral Palsy    Muscular Dystrophy    Spinal Cord Injury    Intellectually Disabled    Visually Impaired    ✓Short Stature

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Athletics

If you can sprint swiftly, throw forcefully, jump brawnfully while enduring a distance run; you have what it takes…

Archery

  • Archery

    Archery may look simple on the surface, just someone shooting an arrow to hit a target. However, to achieve that perfect shot, there are important factors to consider, including having both physical and perceptual stamina. With training, you will be able to appreciate this fine art, which was one of the original Paralympic sports contested in Rome in 1960. Archers will stand at a set distance and shoot at a target marked with ten scoring zones. The sport comprises of individual and team events, standing and wheelchair competitions.

    The governing body for archery is the IPC through the International Paralympic Archery Committee, which follows the rules of FITA (the international governing body for the able-bodied Archery) with a few minor modifications as detailed in the IPC Archery rulebook.

    What’s in it for you?

    Archers challenge themselves on accuracy and profound concentration that require both physical and perceptual stamina. A test of endurance, archery also requires ample amounts of patience. Archery helps enhance one’s self-confidence and teaches one on the importance of safety and responsibility.  Archery is a sport that is designed for and open to athletes who are physically challenged in three functional classes.

    Eligibility

    Amputees    Cerebral Palsy    Spinal Cord Injury   

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Archery

Archery is a sport that can be enjoyed by everyone. Archery may look simple on the surface, but…

Badminton
  • Badminton

    Badminton is an all-rounder sport and a social game which helps improve all-round fitness including flexibility and agility whilst giving you opportunities to socialize with your team mates or opponents. Badminton also helps build self-confidence.  The governing body for Para-Badminton and all internationals events is Badminton World Federation (BWF).

    What’s in it for you?

    A badminton player doesn’t only get the opportunity to possess sportsman qualities but skills worth a lifetime. Regular training in Badminton gives one a happier and healthier life by keeping one fit. This sport helps to increase the player’s stamina while enhancing hand-eye coordination and quick reflexes. What’s more; badminton also acts as a stress reliever allowing one to cope with anxiety so that you can live life to the fullest. It is a tactical game that aids in the development of one’s physical and mental stamina.

    Eligibility

    Amputees    Cerebral Palsy    Spinal Cord Injury    ✓Short Stature  

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Badminton

Badminton is an all-rounder sport and a social game which helps improve all-round fitness including flexibility…

Basketball ID
  • Basketball ID (Intellectual Disabilities)

    What has brought a fresh perspective to Basketball? Without a doubt, it is Basketball ID which has been adapted for athletes diagnosed with Intellectual Disabilities.  Basketball ID requires players to observe and tackle the ball dexterously, and for the defense to intercept passes. With consistent practice, the player’s ability to problem solve will improve and their flair for basketball will progress over time.

    Basketball for ID has been dribbled in various competitive arenas; namely the 2000 Summer Paralympics where it originally showed sight on an international platform.

    What’s in it for you?

    Basketball provides both physical and psychological benefits. Through consistent training, players will benefit from a healthier body weight and be conditioned to make quick reactions which in turn improves the mental consciousness. A basketball player inculcates various sports skills such as defense tactics and speed passing.

    Eligibility

    Intellectually Disabled    

    *The eligibility for participants with intellectual disabilities (ID) is subjected to approval by SDSC

Basketball

Adapted for athletes with Intellectual Disabilities, Basketball ID provides physical and psychological benefits…

Boccia
  • Boccia

    Introduced in 1984 at the New York Paralympic Games, Boccia is one of only two sports which have no Olympic counterpart (the other sport being goalball). Boccia is open to wheelchair-bound athletes with severe cerebral palsy or related neurological conditions.

    The goal of Boccia is simple, but precision is key. Played in a marked court, usually with a hard surface, players throw/roll slightly asymmetrical balls (called bowls) as close as possible to a white target ball (the ‘jack’). The balls can be thrown or rolled by hand or down a ramp (the ‘chute’).  Players who are not able to release a ball down a chute with their hands can use a device called a head pointer. This enables very severely disabled athletes to participate in the sport by releasing the ball by via a movement of their head.  The game must be played from a seated position, which makes it ideal for wheelchair users.

    Players with cerebral palsy are classified as CP1 or CP2 athletes and athletes with other severe physical disabilities (eg, muscular dystrophy) are eligible to compete in Boccia as well. Competitive events are mixed and feature individual, pair and team events. The governing body for Boccia is the International Boccia Commission which is part of the Cerebral Palsy International Sports and Recreational Association (CP-ISRA).

    What’s in it for you?

    The sport challenges the athlete with muscle control and accuracy and commands high focus and concentration. Other benefits include improved general fitness, blood circulation and skills in forward planning. Players learn to strategize and thereby cultivate their ability to make decisions.

    Eligibility

     Cerebral Palsy    Muscular Dystrophy   

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Boccia

Open to wheelchair-bound athletes with severe cerebral palsy or related neurological conditions, Boccia challenges the athlete…

Bowling
  • Bowling

    SDSC is affiliated to The Bowling Association for the Disabled (Singapore), or BADS in short.  BADS, which is a non-profit sports association, was set up with the main objective of bringing bowling to all disabled persons in Singapore. Together, we organize and co-ordinate all bowling activities which will eventually lead to the selection and training of an elite team to represent Singapore in international competitions.

     

    Many bowling centres are now accessible to persons of different abilities;  featuring automated scoring, ‘bumpers’ in gutters for new players, ramps for juniors and people with limited arm or hand strength, and balls with a handle for bowlers unable to use their fingers to hold the ball. Persons with vision impairment use a guide rail to guide their delivery.

    What’s in it for you?

    Bowling is an anaerobic form of physical exercise, similar to walking with free weights. Bowling helps to burn calories and works muscle groups not usually exercised. The flexing and stretching in bowling works tendons, joints, ligaments, and muscles in the arms and promotes weight loss. Apart from physical benefits, bowling is a social sport and therefore provides psychosocial benefits as players build and strengthen friendships in groups.

    While most sports are not for the elderly, it is possible to practice bowling very well at advanced ages. Bowling is also proven to be an excellent rehabilitative and recreational exercise for individuals who use a wheelchair.

    Eligibility

    Amputees    Cerebral Palsy    Spinal Cord Injury    Visually Impaired

Bowling

Bowling is an anaerobic type form of physical exercise, similar to walking with free weights…

Chess
  • Chess

    Chess is not a boring game!  When you play chess, you exercise your brain and hone your honing strategic thinking abilities.  Players will defy their physical disabilities, hearing and, visual impairments to outwit their competitors in this game of minds.

    Athletes may also get an opportunity to participate in the Chess Olympiad, a tournament organised by FIDE( Fédération Internationale des Échecs)where they compete with athletes from three other organisations such as IPCA (International Physically Disabled Chess Association), ICSC (International Committee of Silent Chess) and IBCA (International Braille Chess Association).

    What’s in it for you?

    Chess is a sport that extracts the best in strategic thinking and tactics. Frequent chess practice will not only build expertise in the game of chess, it will inculcate cognitive thinking and decision making skills which empower one both in sports and in life.

     

    Eligibility

    Amputees   Cerebral Palsy    Muscular Dystrophy    Spinal Cord Injury    Visually Impaired

Chess

When you play chess, you exercise your brain and hone your strategic thinking abilities…

Equestrian
  • Equestrian

    Para-Equestrian riders don’t only don their garbs with sophistication but also display sporting prowess. Equestrian is a multi-disability sport, open to athletes with bodily disabilities or even visual impairment.

    Initial Equestrian events came into sight on the Paralympic programme in 1984 in Stoke Mandeville (UK) and New York (US) and were incorporated as part of the Paralympic Games in 1996 at Atlanta.  The regulating body for Equestrian is IPC through the International Paralympics Equestrian Committee (IPEC). IPC rules and procedures are in accordance with the International Equestrian Federation (FEI) with small modifications.

    What’s in it for you?

    The Equestrian sport brings about a bagful of benefits ranging from muscle endurance to tranquil practices. An equestrian would have intense muscle training when horsing, as one’s quadriceps would work towards keeping the torso stable throughout the entire course. In addition, thigh muscles would also strengthen as one astrides the horse while shoulders work to lift the arms. Importantly, equestrians learn the skill of remaining serene even in times of crisis, which is the result of consistent practice in equestrian as riders deal with horses which are “human-sensitive”.

    Eligibility

    Amputees    Cerebral Palsy    Muscular Dystrophy    Spinal Cord Injury    Short Stature

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Equestrian

Equestrian is a multi-disability sport, open to athletes with bodily disabilities or even visual impairment…

Cerebral Palsy Football
  • Cerebral Palsy Football

    Cerebral Palsy Football caters to footballers with Cerebral Palsy (CP). And just like football, with its blend of speed, agility and impressive ball handling, CP Football is no exception in making its mark as one of the world’s most electrifying sports.

    This sport’s governing body is IFCPF (International Federation of CP Football).

    What’s in it for you?

    CP Football is a rehabilitative sport that demands your spontaneous reflexes to be at their best. A CP Footballer will acquire impromptu improvising handiness, creativity in the fingertips, plus unique individual skills such as ball control and feints. To add on, training in CP Football boosts all-round fitness and self-confidence along with discipline, patience and mental sharpness. Since it is a team game, the skill of group coordination and teamwork would be put at test during competitions. Hence, CP Football develops a complete sportsman.

    Cerebral Palsy

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Cerebral Palsy Football

Just like Football, CP Football is one of the world’s most electrifying sports with its blend of speed, agility and impressive ball handling…

Goalball
  • Goalball

    Goalball is a team sport designed specifically for blind athletes and was originally designed to assist in the rehabilitation of visually impaired World War II veterans. Participants compete in teams of three and try to throw a ball embedded with bells into the opponents’ goal. Teams alternate throwing or rolling the ball from one end of the playing area to the other, and players remain in the area of their own goal in both defence and attack. Players must use the sound of the bell to judge the position and movement of the ball. Games consist of two 12-minute halves. Eyeshades allow partially sighted players to compete on an equal footing with blind players. It is an intensely unique spectator sport given the venue atmosphere and extreme concentration and silence required by the athletes.

    What’s in it for you?

    Most people who are visually impaired or blind usually do not have many opportunities to be involved in team sports and physical activity. Goalball requires team communication, coordination and strategic skills, and offers many social and physical benefits. Hence, one of the great benefits of goal ball is that it promotes teamwork and cooperation among participants.

    In addition, because goalball acts as a medium for breaking down barriers as individuals who are sighted and visually impaired can play together at a recreational level. A natural result of this is that it helps promote awareness within the community of what individuals who are visually impaired can do.

    Eligibility

    Visually Impaired

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Goalball

Goalball is a team sport designed specifically for blind athletes. It requires team communication and offers many social and physical benefits…

Para Cycling
  • Para Cycling

    Many former able-bodied sporting stars have made waves in Para Cycling including ex-Formula One driver and Paralympic gold medallist Alex Zanardi. Today, Para Cycling is one of the world’s fastest growing disability sports and one of the biggest sports at the Paralympic Games in terms of medal events.

    Para cycling offers something for everyone who wants to get on a bike. In Singapore, SDSC works with the Para Cycling Federation of Singapore (PCFS) to train and develop Para Cyclists in three classes:  Handcycles, Bicycles and Tandems.  Persons with physical impairment can train/compete on bicycles or handcycles (handcycling requires peddling the handbike sitting down using arm power, improving core muscles); while those with a visual impairment train/compete on tandems with a sighted ‘pilot’, working with their legs to reach break neck speeds. Para-Cycling is divided into track and road events and is suitable for all levels.

    What’s in it for you?

    Para Cycling brings about a copious amount of physical and mental health benefits. It provides participants with a low impact fat-burning cardio workout and offers alternative rehabilitative physiotherapy for people who are recovering from injury or who with disabilities such as cerebral palsy, stroke and amputations.  The sport takes participants on an exhilarating journey towards a healthier lifestyle and helps nurture a mindset of perseverance that comes from adapting to weather conditions and the unpredictability of road races. Whether it is in a racing arena or against the beating wind on the road, Para Cycling promises high speed thrills and gives participants a taste of adventure.

    Eligibility

    Amputees    Cerebral Palsy    Spinal Cord Injury    ✓Visual Impairment

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Para Cycling

Many former able-bodied sporting stars have made waves in Para Cycling including ex-Formula One driver and Paralympic gold medallist Alex Zanardi…

Lawnbowl
  • Lawnbowls

    Lawn bowls is a precision sport in which the goal is to roll slightly asymmetrical balls (called bowls) closer to a smaller white ball (the ‘jack’) than your opponent is able to.

    It is one of the oldest ball games around and provides an inclusive environment for players of all ages and abilities to play, socially or competitively.

    Played on both normal green and synthetic surfaces, Lawn bowls is a multi-disability sport in which people with physical disabilities can participate equally with able-bodied competitors without rule changes.

    Whats in it for you?

    Health professionals recommend playing lawn bowls, particularly for older people, as it provides a number of health benefits, including:

    • Improved fitness
    • Improved coordination and skill development
    • Increased confidence and self-esteem
    • Enhanced mental wellbeing
    • Low risk physical activity due to its low impact nature
    • Social contact, inculcating friendships due to the group nature of the sport
    • Community connectedness and support.

    Eligibility

    Amputees    Cerebral Palsy    Spinal Cord Injury 

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Lawnbowl

Lawn bowls is a precision sport which provides an inclusive environment for players of all ages and abilities to play, socially or competitively.

Powerchair Football
  • Powerchair Football

    Powerchair Football is a competitive team sport for people with disabilities who use power wheelchairs. The game is played in a gymnasium or a basketball court. Two teams of four players use powerchairs equipped with footguards to attack, defend, and spin-kick a 13-inch football in an attempt to score goals.

    The sport is played on a standard-sized basketball court. Each team is allowed 4 players on the court at one time including the goalkeeper. A match consists of two 20-minute periods. Because of the two-dimensional aspect of this game (players are typically unable to kick the ball into the air), artificial space has to be created around the players.

    The two distinct differences in the laws from the able bodied game are: 1) the “two-on-one” rule, and 2) the 3-in-the-goal-area violation.

    “2-on-1”: only a player and an opponent are allowed within 3 meters of the ball when it is in play. If a teammate of either one comes within the 3 meters the referee may call an infringement and award an indirect free kick. This forces the players to spread the field and prevents clogging up of play, allowing for a greater free flow of play. The only exception to this violation is if one of the 2 teammates is a goalkeeper inside his/her own goal area, then there is no infraction of the laws.

    “3-in-the-goal-area”: the defending team is only allowed to have 2 players in their own goal area. If a third player enters the area, the referee may stop the game and award an indirect free kick to the opposing team.

    What’s in it for you?

    Studies show that potential benefits to participating in group activities, particularly power chair football, include improvements in:

    • Upper body strength
    • Range of motion
    • Respiratory functioning
    • Eye-hand coordination
    • Powerchair driving skills
    • Overall quality of life

    Eligibility

    Muscular Dystrophy

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Powerchair Football

Powerchair Football is a competitive team sport for people with disabilities who use power wheelchairs…

Powerlifting
  • Powerlifting

    Powerlifting is the ultimate challenge of strength and endurance.  Open to persons with Cerebral Palsy (CP), Spinal Cord injuries, amputees (lower limb only) and les auras who meet the minimum disability criteria, the sport requires athletes to lower the bar, hold it to their chest motionless and subsequently press it upwards to arm’s length with elbows locked. Powerlifting is contested across 10 different categories based on criteria such as ability and body weight.

    Initially known as Weightlifting, Powerlifting was first introduced in the Paralympic Games in 1964 at Tokyo. The female Powerlifting category made its debut at the Sydney Paralympics in 2000.

     

    What’s in it for you?

    Training for this sport can make you stronger than you ever thought possible. Powerlifitng is a sport that tests endurance levels along with physical fitness and helps athletes achieve a defined and strong body. Women powerlifters do not need to fear bulking up as women are genetically not programmed to do so – what you’ll get is a well-toned and strong body.

    Eligibility

    Amputees    Cerebral Palsy    Spinal Cord Injury    ✓Short Stature

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Powerlifting

Powerlifting is the ultimate challenge of strength and endurance.  Open to persons with Cerebral Palsy (CP), Spinal Cord injuries, amputees (lower limb only)…

Sailing
  • Sailing

    Sailing was introduced in 1996 at the Paralympics held at Atlanta as an exhibition event and eventually went on to become a full medal sport in 2000 at the Paralympics at Sydney. The sailor’s election is influenced by the classification system based on four factors for athlete’s safekeeping such as stability, hand function, mobility and vision.

     

    Sailing’s governing body is the International Foundation for Disabled Sailing (IFDS), which in turn is recognized by the International Sailing Federation.

    What’s in it for you?

    From improving self-esteem to empowering leadership skills, Sailing is a sport that holds numerous benefits for participants. A sailor learns to be independent since he/she would be controlling the sail alone out at sea. Physical benefits include improved muscle tone, increase in body strength and improved coordination due to the range of movement required. Sailing is both fun and beneficial, triggering both mind and body to work at the same time.

    Eligibility

    Amputees    Cerebral Palsy    Muscular Dystrophy    Spinal Cord Injury    

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Sailing

From improving self-esteem to empowering leadership skills, Sailing is a sport that holds numerous benefits for participants…

Shooting
  • Shooting

    Shooting is a sport that will put your control, concentration and precision into a constant test. Each competitor shoots at the 10 centric score rings, the score varies from the scale of 1 to 10, with 10 indicating the highest (centre scoring ring). However, the scoring zone would be further divided in the later stages of the competition, making 10.8 the highest score. Shooting competitions are divided into two major events; air rifle and pistol. Shooting competitors would be shooting at a distance of 10m, 25m and 50m.

    The governing body for shooting is the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) which is also coordinated by the IPC Shooting Technical Committee following the modified rules of the International Shooting Sports Federation (ISSF).

    What’s in it for you?

    Shooting improves hand eye coordination and mental discipline, and helps build confidence. It can be a physically demanding sport as well.

    Eligibility

    Amputees    Cerebral Palsy    Muscular Dystrophy    Spinal Cord Injury    

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Shooting

Shooting is a sport that will put your control, concentration and precision into a constant test. Each competitor shoots…

Swimming
  • Swimming

    Swimming is both a rehabilitative and competitive sport, helping participants burn calories and relieve stress at the same time. Swimming also enables you to push yourself to your limits whilst experiencing a sense of freedom in the water.

    The governing body for swimming is the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) through the International Paralympic Swimming Committee (IPSC), which incorporates the rules of Federation Internationale de Natation (FINA). The international swimming rules are followed with a few exceptions, such as optional platforms or in-water starts for some races and the use of signals or “tappers” for swimmers with visual impairment; however no prostheses or assistive devices are permitted.

    What’s in it for you?

    If you are looking for a sport without barriers, then take your pick with Swimming – the only sport that caters to diverse classifications of disabilities. Swimmers relish freedom in mobility in water whilst getting mentally and physically fit.   Swimming also improves muscle strength, stability and agility while reducing strains at the joints due to water buoyancy and the low impact of exercise in water. As one’s body weight in water is only 10 percent of its actual weight, swimmers feel light and at ease in water.

    Eligibility

    Amputees    Cerebral Palsy    Muscular Dystrophy    Spinal Cord Injury    Intellectually Disabled    ✓Short Stature    Visually Impaired

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Swimming

Swimming is both a rehabilitative and competitive sport, helping participants burn calories and experience a sense of freedom in the water…

Table Tennis
  • Table Tennis

    First included in the 1960 Paralympics at Rome, para Table Tennis is, today, the third largest Paralympic sport in terms of athlete numbers and is played by millions of people worldwide. Open to athletes from all physical and intellectual impairment groups, aside from the visually impaired, the sport promises to be an enriching and beneficial activity for all who take it up.

    The governing body for Table Tennis is the IPC through the International Paralympic Table Tennis Committee. The rules of the International Table Tennis competitions (ITTF) also apply to the Paralympic Table Tennis competitions with slight modifications for wheelchair athletes.

    What’s in it for you?

    From quick-witted reactions to improved hand-eye coordination, the list of the benefits of table tennis is impressive. Table Tennis instils a mindset in players to always be ready for challenges, thus improving their reaction time to spins and placements of the ball. What’s more, a Table Tennis player gains improved reflexes over the gradual course of Table Tennis training.  The sport also improves hand-eye coordination(by following the ball’s trajectory), increases the flow of blood to the brain, hones cognitive skills and improves reflexes(working on both gross and fine muscle movements), among others.

    Eligibility

    Amputees    Cerebral Palsy    Muscular Dystrophy    Spinal Cord Injury    Intellectually Disabled    ✓Short Stature 

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Table Tennis

Para Table Tennis is, today, the third largest Paralympic sport in terms of athlete numbers and is played by millions of people worldwide…

Wheelchair basketball
  • Wheelchair basketball

    Originally developed for rehabilitation by World War II veterans, Wheelchair Basketball was introduced in the 1960 Paralympics at Rome is one of the most popular sports at the Paralympic Games today. Each team comprises of five players, and the game’s goal is to prevent the opposing team from getting the ball and scoring a goal.

    The International Wheelchair Basketball Federation (IWBF) is the sole world governing body for the sport.

    What’s in it for you?

    Even though leg movements are limited, the torso of players need to be well built. Regular training will also help participants improve agility, reaction time and thought processing.  Since Wheelchair basketball is a game played in groups, it is a social game that fosters friendships and solidarity among team members while instilling self-control and responsibility.

    Eligibility

    Amputees    ✓Cerebral Palsy    Spinal Cord Injury

    More on Wheelchair Basketball

Wheelchair Basketball

Since Wheelchair basketball is a game played in groups, it is a social game that fosters friendships and solidarity among team members…